August 12, 2013

Vermont's dairy cows are headed for Hollywood.A new documentary film, focusing on the innovative 'Cow Power' program, premiered in Rutland to rave reviews and will open in Los Angeles later this month.

Cow Power also offers a grants program available to Vermont dairy farmers, funded by Green Mountain Power and administered by the Vermont Community Loan Fund.

"Cow Power ”“ the Film" tells the story of the program that helps Vermont dairy farms convert their farm waste into renewable energy. Manure is collected and processed by a methane digester, creating an environmentally-friendly, sustainable energy source.

The film was produced and directed by 22-year old native Vermonter Allison Gillette. Gillette grew up in Ludlow, with an awareness of the financial and other challenges facing Vermont dairy farmers, and of the growing need for new and sustainable energy sources. When she discovered that Green Mountain Power and VCLF partnered to make funds available to dairy farmers, she decided to spread the word about Cow Power.

Green Mountain Power, which took over the program in 2011 from Central Vermont Public Service, notes on its website that "One cow produces over 30 gallons of manure a day". With twelve Vermont family farms now participating in the program, each managing roughly 1,000 cows, the effort currently generates 16,000,000 kilowatt hours annually.

Will Belongia, VCLF's Executive Director who has administered the grants since the program's inception in 2005, said "The methane removed and converted from farm waste accounts for 25% of greenhouse gasses. The fact that we can reduce greenhouse gasses while building a sustainable energy resource and supporting Vermont's hardworking dairy farmers makes this program a win, all around," he said.

You can support the Cow Power program with a donation on the VCLF website at investinvermont.com.After the film's Los Angeles opening, 'Cow Power' will be available for viewing in late August on the internet at www.cowpowerfilm.com

August 12, 2013

Vermont's dairy cows are headed for Hollywood.A new documentary film, focusing on the innovative 'Cow Power' program, premiered in Rutland to rave reviews and will open in Los Angeles later this month.

Cow Power also offers a grants program available to Vermont dairy farmers, funded by Green Mountain Power and administered by the Vermont Community Loan Fund.

"Cow Power ”“ the Film" tells the story of the program that helps Vermont dairy farms convert their farm waste into renewable energy. Manure is collected and processed by a methane digester, creating an environmentally-friendly, sustainable energy source.

The film was produced and directed by 22-year old native Vermonter Allison Gillette. Gillette grew up in Ludlow, with an awareness of the financial and other challenges facing Vermont dairy farmers, and of the growing need for new and sustainable energy sources. When she discovered that Green Mountain Power and VCLF partnered to make funds available to dairy farmers, she decided to spread the word about Cow Power.

Green Mountain Power, which took over the program in 2011 from Central Vermont Public Service, notes on its website that "One cow produces over 30 gallons of manure a day". With twelve Vermont family farms now participating in the program, each managing roughly 1,000 cows, the effort currently generates 16,000,000 kilowatt hours annually.

Will Belongia, VCLF's Executive Director who has administered the grants since the program's inception in 2005, said "The methane removed and converted from farm waste accounts for 25% of greenhouse gasses. The fact that we can reduce greenhouse gasses while building a sustainable energy resource and supporting Vermont's hardworking dairy farmers makes this program a win, all around," he said.

You can support the Cow Power program with a donation on the VCLF website at investinvermont.com.After the film's Los Angeles opening, 'Cow Power' will be available for viewing in late August on the internet at www.cowpowerfilm.com

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